Ave M. Bie

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Quarles & Brady Business Law, Utilities and Energy Attorney Ave Bie Named Board Chair for New York Independent System Operator (NYISO)

Nonprofit NYISO Operates New York State’s Power Grid

MADISON, Wis. — The national law firm of Quarles & Brady LLP today announced that business law, utilities and energy attorney Ave Bie, managing partner of the firm’s Madison office, has been named board chair for the New York Independent System Operator (NYISO), the nonprofit that operates New York state’s power gird.

Bie, former chair of the Wisconsin Public Service Commission, joined the NYISO board of directors in April 2009. She has served as chair of the governance committee and the commerce and compensation committee and became vice chair of the board in 2017.

Bie has spent her career serving in state and local government positions and counseling utilities and independent power producers. Her experience encompasses all aspects of energy and utilities, from government relations and permitting to counseling on infrastructure and long-range planning. Most of her time is spent developing regulatory strategies to critical infrastructure and renewable portfolio standards for her clients, which range from investor-owned utilities and independent power producers to telecommunications companies.

“Ave has earned national recognition not only for her wide range of legislative and regulatory experience, but also for her pragmatic and passionate approach,” said Quarles & Brady chair Kimberly Johnson. “She brings a wealth of knowledge to this expanded role with NYISO, knowledge that will benefit and help the organization do its important work.”

Bie, who joined Quarles & Brady in 2005, earned her law degree from the University of Wisconsin-Madison and a bachelor’s degree, cum laude, from the University of Wisconsin-Eau Claire. She is a member of the board of directors of the Green Bay Packers.

About the New York Independent System Operator
Based in the Capital Region of New York, the NYISO is a not-for-profit company governed by a 10-member, independent board of directors. The NYISO, which monitors a network of 11,000 miles of high-voltage transmission lines across the state, employs more than 500 people working in two facilities near Albany.